Society

<strong></strong>I lied on my college applications, but not in the way you’re thinking of
LGBTQ+

I lied on my college applications, but not in the way you’re thinking of

I lied on my college applications. No, there were no made up anecdotes or faked photos of me on sports teams. In fact, there weren’t many made up details on my college applications at all, so technically it wasn’t even really lying. Unlike the families caught in the college scandals earlier this year, I put in the work. I wrote my own essays. I took my SAT and did, compared to most of my friends, relatively trash. I double, triple, quadruple checked for typos and grammar errors. My parents went over every last detail before saying “Yeah, it looks fine. Submit it” and watching me submit my applications, one by one, on the 21st of November, my 18th birthday (I spent my birthday doing my college apps. You didn't?) The thing is, no details were falsified, but many were left out. S...
<strong></strong>The McCanns would have gone to trial if they weren’t rich and white
Society

The McCanns would have gone to trial if they weren’t rich and white

The Madeleine McCann documentary is all anyone can talk about at the moment, after the full 8-part series dropped on Netflix last week. And honestly, this isn't surprising: Generation Z has grown up on the sensationalisation of what is a heartbreaking story, and it’s served to encourage the popularity of conspiracy theories — conspiracy theories about literally everything, let’s be real. The McCann case has been reported on, fictionalised, made into a book, the works, and it’s no wonder that people — especially young people — have become detached from the story. It no longer seems like real life, and how can it when it was reported on and treated as if it was a case from a movie. The McCanns became tragically famous overnight when in reality everyone should have been focused on finding th...
<strong></strong>Christchurch: more proof that normalising Islamophobia has consequences
Society

Christchurch: more proof that normalising Islamophobia has consequences

49 innocent people, attending their place of worship, have been brutally murdered in a terrorist attack on the Al Noor and Linwood mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. 48 others, including young children, were injured. Jacinda Ardern, the country’s prime minister, described today’s events of as “one of New Zealand’s darkest days”. There are no adequate thoughts for such a disgusting, racially motivated mass murder, other than that its ideological roots are easily identifiable. The murderer responsible for this despicable act published a 73-page manifesto prior to the attack, outlining racist and Islamophobic views that have been proliferated for years across the West by the far-right and the alt-right. Arguably, these views have spread to an even greater extent over the last decade or...