LGBTQ+

<strong></strong>An open letter to my straight white cisgender friends
LGBTQ+

An open letter to my straight white cisgender friends

Dear straight cisgender white friend, I know you’re not racist, or homophobic, or sexist, or xenophobic, or transphobic, consciously ableist, or a full-fledged bigot. I know you mean well. I know you; I know the way you fall silent when I say “white people” or “cisgender people” or “the straights.” I have spent the last eight years of my life navigating our conversations without getting too controversial. Without bringing up my many gripes with you — more specifically with the group of people you fall into. I don’t know how to put it nicely. Perhaps there’s no nice way to put it, but it’s a confrontation that needs to happen; you look like, talk like, and act like my oppressor. And, dear friend, this world is built around you. Every system is built for your survival and succes...
<strong></strong>I lied on my college applications, but not in the way you’re thinking of
LGBTQ+

I lied on my college applications, but not in the way you’re thinking of

I lied on my college applications. No, there were no made up anecdotes or faked photos of me on sports teams. In fact, there weren’t many made up details on my college applications at all, so technically it wasn’t even really lying. Unlike the families caught in the college scandals earlier this year, I put in the work. I wrote my own essays. I took my SAT and did, compared to most of my friends, relatively trash. I double, triple, quadruple checked for typos and grammar errors. My parents went over every last detail before saying “Yeah, it looks fine. Submit it” and watching me submit my applications, one by one, on the 21st of November, my 18th birthday (I spent my birthday doing my college apps. You didn't?) The thing is, no details were falsified, but many were left out. S...
<strong></strong>Today, the Brazilian people have queer blood on their hands
LGBTQ+, World Politics

Today, the Brazilian people have queer blood on their hands

In March of last year, a video from Fortaleza in north-eastern Brazil went viral. It features 42-year-old trans woman Dandara dos Santos stripped, covered in blood, and begging for her life as a gang of men laugh and jeer. They taunt her, kick her, punch her. They beat her with shoes and a wooden plank, and tell her they “will kill the faggot”. They throw her into a wheelchair, undressed and bloodied, and they take her off to be shot.  Because they were brazen enough to post the video, Dandara’s murderers did face justice — a rarity in a country which last year saw an LGBT person murdered every 23 hours for who they are.Despite a flourishing LGBT community (São Paulo hosts the largest pride parade in the world) and a progressive image on the world stage, Brazi...