Music

<strong></strong>Josef’s Jukebox — ‘New York Dolls’ by The New York Dolls
Music

Josef’s Jukebox — ‘New York Dolls’ by The New York Dolls

“I don’t really like to sit around the house listening to my own records. They’re not that good”. One reads David Johansen’s speech and thinks ‘what a curious proclamation’. Was he simply espousing the truth about a band whose discography received wholesale rejection by the corporate establishment? Or yet more wily sass from Staten Island’s greatest musical antagonist? I would plump for the latter. For the Dolls’ debut is unique in the canon of contemporary pop and, like Johansen’s statement, filled with contrarianism. Glamorous yet filthy; feminine yet masculine; a type of proto-punk wholly relatable yet so foreign to the modern ear. A sonic niche that only one record continues to fill. In ’71, Johansen (joined by guitarists Johnny Thunders & Sylvain Sylvain, bassist Arthur ‘Killer’ ...
<strong></strong>Introducing Fontaines DC: the best new band of 2019
Music

Introducing Fontaines DC: the best new band of 2019

It’s a shame I didn’t arrive earlier to see Shame’s show in Camden in November last year, but catching the end of support act Fontaines D.C.’s set was enough to have me hooked. The repetition of ‘Hurricane Laughter’s high-octane riff as frontman Grian Chatten shouts “there is no connection available!” is as addictive as it is memorable. Yet they have so much more to offer than the post-punk-meets-rock-and-roll sound that initially drew me in. Months later I came across ‘Big’. This short burst of brilliance immediately grabbed my attention, leaving me craving more of the band’s unique character. Tied into their unique fusion of sounds — from Joy Division to The Rolling Stones, The Cure to The Clash, and everything in between — is Chatten’s poetic conception of Dublin, a city he love...
‘There Will Be No Intermission’ is Amanda Palmer’s strongest album yet
Music

‘There Will Be No Intermission’ is Amanda Palmer’s strongest album yet

Released on 8 March 2019, Amanda Palmer’s new solo album ‘There Will Be No Intermission’ is her most accomplished and mature album yet. Palmer returns to her classic punk-piano sound, heard in Who Killed Amanda Palmer (2008), this time with a ukulele, strings and a mixture of experimental sound effects behind her. The album is unapologetically politically charged at points, drawing on current issues such as climate change and fake news. Differing to her previous solo albums, the underlying tone of the album is incredibly dark with songs that tell stories of abortion, grief and struggling with motherhood. Everything is acutely personal. I first discovered Amanda Palmer’s band, The Dresden Dolls, in 2014 as a teenager wanting to just scream along to angry punk-cabaret piano music. Since...