Author: Toby Berrett

Toby Berrett is the Co-Founder and Co-Editor-in-Chief of The Slant. He studies English Literature and Politics at the University of Sussex, and formerly at the University of Warsaw.
Lockdown leisure: our recreation recommendations for these isolated times
Arts and Culture

Lockdown leisure: our recreation recommendations for these isolated times

With the UK now in lockdown due to the increasing spread of coronavirus, non-essential shops, pubs, restaurants, theatres, gyms and more have been closed, and we’ve all been told we must stay indoors unless for food or medicine, essential work, or one socially-distant exercise per day. With NHS staff toiling on the frontlines along with other essential workers in shops, schools and more, the least the rest of us can do is stay at home and sit down with a cuppa to suppress its spread. To help you do just that, we asked the Slant team which albums, series, films, books, and podcasts are accompanying us through isolation. From a book about video games through to Netflix recommendations; from a sports podcast through to fifteenth century music, we really do have it all. So, get comfy ...
<strong></strong>Introducing Fontaines DC: the best new band of 2019
Music

Introducing Fontaines DC: the best new band of 2019

It’s a shame I didn’t arrive earlier to see Shame’s show in Camden in November last year, but catching the end of support act Fontaines D.C.’s set was enough to have me hooked. The repetition of ‘Hurricane Laughter’s high-octane riff as frontman Grian Chatten shouts “there is no connection available!” is as addictive as it is memorable. Yet they have so much more to offer than the post-punk-meets-rock-and-roll sound that initially drew me in. Months later I came across ‘Big’. This short burst of brilliance immediately grabbed my attention, leaving me craving more of the band’s unique character. Tied into their unique fusion of sounds — from Joy Division to The Rolling Stones, The Cure to The Clash, and everything in between — is Chatten’s poetic conception of Dublin, a city he love...
<strong></strong>Four reasons to vote in the European Parliamentary elections
European Politics

Four reasons to vote in the European Parliamentary elections

In case you hadn’t heard, with a delay to the Brexit date having been granted until up to the end of October, citizens of the UK can now vote one last time for their representatives in the European Parliament. Turnout in European Parliamentary (EP) elections is notoriously low, with many people considering them second-order elections and opting not to vote, leading to a democratic deficit and the increased strength of more fringe parties when compared to national parliaments. Whatever your views are usually on EP elections, there’s no denying this will be the UK’s most important one yet. So, with all that said, here’s why you should make sure you’re registered to vote by 7 May, and that you hand in your ballot paper on 23 May. 1. Nigel Farage Of course, there’s a bias here. But, thi...
<strong></strong>With ‘Exits’, Foals prove they’re as fresh as ever
Music

With ‘Exits’, Foals prove they’re as fresh as ever

It’s been a few days now since Foals released Exits, the first single from their upcoming fifth and sixth albums to be unleashed for our listening pleasure. If you’re a Foals fan and you haven’t yet heard it, I implore you to climb out from the rock you’ve been living under and listen to it before reading any further. Maybe two or three times. If you’re less familiar with Foals, the same still applies, except perhaps for the whole living under a rock thing. Done? Let’s move on. Time is of the essence: the Oxford rockers are back and I couldn’t be more excited. Upon first listen, I was a little disappointed. I was sure other songs might be better, but there was nothing about Exits that thrilled me. Its sound didn’t seem new, yet it simultaneously lacked the familiar ferocity of other...
<strong></strong>Shame’s 'Songs of Praise': my album of the year
Music

Shame’s 'Songs of Praise': my album of the year

It was a mild January morning when I came across Michael Hann’s interview with south London’s Shame. Little did I know, that moment would come to define my 2018, with their debut album Songs of Praise providing the soundtrack to such an important year in my life. Returning to uni for the first time since Christmas, I fought the urge to chant singer Charlie Steen’s addictive lyrics as I marched along the platform at Brighton station, blasting Shame’s non-stop anthems through my headphones. I was optimistic, and Shame’s sound was one of freedom. Loud, anthemic, and delivered with urgency, Shame amalgamate britpop with the grittier ferocity of post-punk bands like The Fall and the London punk scene of the 1970s and 80s. Watching them live, it’s impossible not to shout alo...
<strong></strong>The Slant: 2018 review
Update

The Slant: 2018 review

2018 has been an exciting year for us all at The Slant. During our first year as a website, we’ve grown in numbers both in contributors and our readership. Over 1400 individual people have visited our homepage, and many more have read our contributors’ articles. Our homepage has been visited almost 3000 times overall. 2018’s most popular slants The Slant wouldn’t be possible without the incredible work of its contributors. As an editor, it’s a joy to read such a broad range of well written and researched articles. The top 5 most read articles of 2018 were as follows: Why anti-white ‘racism’ is the least of my concerns Gurpreet Raulia’s slant on “people wanting sympathy in the face of anti-white comments” was read by 236 individual people. Read it here. Dyslexia can be a gift, ...
Boris may have won over the media, but don’t let him fool anyone else
UK Politics

Boris may have won over the media, but don’t let him fool anyone else

"I have nothing to say about this matter except to offer you some tea..." @BorisJohnson greets the media armed with a tray of mugs amid burka row pic.twitter.com/5wknsuUBTH — ITV News (@itvnews) August 12, 2018 Thanks, but no thanks. As Boris Johnson handed a crowd of reporters a tray of tea in a selection of familiar household mugs, as if offering it to the nation, he successfully avoided any speck of accountability for his op-ed in The Telegraph in which he suggests that niqab-wearing Muslim women “go around looking like letter boxes” and “bank robbers”. Simultaneously, he ensured that only one clip from a day’s worth of reporting was shown to the world: his carefully planned, strategic move to generate positive publicity, its virality helped by the disgust of myself and others ali...
Big Brother doesn’t need to watch you when he has all your data
Science and Technology, UK Politics, US Politics

Big Brother doesn’t need to watch you when he has all your data

So, this is it. We’ve all experienced a strange urge to give everything we know about ourselves to an unspecified, unregulated entity. Who’d have thought becoming functioning members of modern civilisation would come with so many sacrifices? We knew handing over our basic information to Facebook would have some cost: what if they spam our emails or sell our phone numbers to cold callers? What if they find a way to hack our bank accounts? Of course, with a simple cost-benefit analysis we knew the chances of a giant multinational company robbing our money against our will were fairly slim. It wouldn’t exactly be great for Capitalism if we had no capital. But letting Facebook in on our interests, hobbies, politics, social class... this would all be harmless, right? We’d share ...
WATCH: Protesting The Ban
US Politics, Video

WATCH: Protesting The Ban

Protesting the travel ban: Toby Berrett’s video documents Oxford’s 2016 protest against Trump’s inhumane and illiberal ban on immigration from a selection of Muslim countries.    
Donald Trump won because the left didn’t listen
US Politics

Donald Trump won because the left didn’t listen

A year ago, the Washington establishment couldn’t have imagined Donald Trump being elected into the presidency. And more recently, the educated left believed they could tarnish his campaign by labelling it as racist, bigoted and hostile. The only way the left can stay credible is by engaging with people to help it create its own inspiring alternative to current circumstances. For years, elitist politicians and corporate interests have exploited the working class. In Britain, years of the establishment’s disregard for real, widespread working class issues were amalgamated in the Brexit vote. In America, the same happened for Trump. His victory is a tragedy for the west, and it has led right wing authoritarian bigots to feel vindicated. Right wing populism is threatening leftist progressi...