Author: Sam Sullivan

The Transportation Arms Race needs to end: here’s why
Science and Technology

The Transportation Arms Race needs to end: here’s why

  I’m going to be honest right out of the gate, this wasn’t a fun one to research, and it won’t be a fun one to read. 28 May 2012 - Mark Brummell, a Southampton cyclist, is struck and killed whilst cycling through Ipley Cross on the edge of the New Forest. 2 December 2016 - Kieran Dix, also a cyclist. Also struck at the Ipley Cross junction. Spends 2 months in hospital before succumbing to his injuries. At first sight, Ipley Cross is just another regular road crossing. Visibility is good. In fact it’s near enough perfect, with nought but a slight slope on the north east side of the junction to obscure lines of sight. It's not particularly heavily trafficked, being in the countryside and not on any main routes. To the average onlooker, Ipley Cross is perfectly safe. So why so deadly?...
Formula 1: Halo proves its worth as Vettel storms to victory
Sport

Formula 1: Halo proves its worth as Vettel storms to victory

Coming into this Formula 1 race weekend in Belgium, it was almost certain that, no matter what happened, this would be a race worth watching. Indeed, as a lifelong F1 fan who fell out of love with the sport 2 or 3 years ago, this was the race I chose to come back to. Spa-Francorchamps has always had a flair for the dramatic, and with Sebastian Vettel looking to close in on Lewis Hamilton's 24 point lead at the top of the Drivers Championship, the stakes were certainly high. Free Practice and Qualifying passed somewhat uneventfully, with the only notable excitement coming as a result of the unique Ardennes climate that makes this track so special, and its ability to switch from bone-dry to flooded in a matter of metres, something which caught Valtteri Bottas off guard as he spun out on h...
World of Warcraft: How the MMORPG genre killed RTS games
Gaming

World of Warcraft: How the MMORPG genre killed RTS games

Growing up in the early 2000s as part of a relatively large, relatively poor family provided a unique experience for me when it came to gaming. Whilst my friends at school were whiling away the hours on their Xbox 360s and PS3s, ranking up in Call of Duty Modern Warfare or taking on the Covenant in Halo, my hours were spent with an old PC the size of a suitcase, a hand me down from my grandfather that ran on Windows 95. Nowadays, that PC wouldn't even run the simplest of indie games, but for the duration of my childhood, that chunky off-white box that I couldn’t even lift was home to a collection of the finest games the 90s had to offer. While my friends spent their days bragging about what new gun they’d unlocked in their favourite shooter, I was commanding armies in Command and Conquer. ...