Author: James Cottis

Second-year English Literature student at the University of Sheffield. Can be found frequently listening to Shirley Bassey and shaking from a silly amount of caffeine.
<strong></strong>“The Brexit that was promised cannot be delivered”: Alastair Campbell talks exclusively to The Slant
European Politics, UK Politics

“The Brexit that was promised cannot be delivered”: Alastair Campbell talks exclusively to The Slant

Like and follow us on Facebook and Twitter. These are uncertain and volatile times; our country is in a perpetual state of limbo. This week, in particular, proved just how high the tensions are running around the Commons — with the abuse of journalist Owen Jones, and the heckling of Conservative MP Anna Soubry, who live on the BBC was repeatedly called a Nazi and a liar.  Then, on Tuesday and Wednesday, in an attempt to tie Theresa May’s hands, parliamentarians rightly took some control away from the executive and handed it back to Parliament. A rebellion of Tory backbenchers forced the Government into losing two historic votes in just under 24 hours; the first limiting the tax powers of the Government in the event of a ‘No-Deal’ Brexit; the second forcing Theres...
Start as you mean to go on? If that’s the case, then I’m worried.
World Politics

Start as you mean to go on? If that’s the case, then I’m worried.

Without being pessimistic, 2018 was a very bad year for nature. 2018 saw the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) give us a damning and frankly terrifying ultimatum: keep global warming below 1.5ºC, or in 12 years see the environment reach a breaking point. 2018 was a year without the United States in the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. Last year oversaw saw the Trump Administration dismiss an exhaustive national climate report that revealed that “Rising temperatures, extreme heat, drought, wildfire on rangelands, and heavy downpours are expected to increasingly disrupt agricultural productivity in the United States.” And, in October, the world saw the election of the Jair Bolsonaro into power in Brazil:  a man set on stripping back decades of environmental and indigenous protect...
Album of The Week: Superfood’s 'Bambino'
Music

Album of The Week: Superfood’s 'Bambino'

Welcome to Album of the Week. In this new series, our contributors will be bringing you exciting new music recommendations, drawing from all corners of the music world to share their favourite albums, and to explain what makes them worth listening to. This week’s suggestion comes from James Cottis.  2017 was a year of massive change for me: it was the year I started university. I moved away from home and started at the University of Sheffield. I became independent, and found myself surrounded with people that I wanted to spend my time with. It really is a period of my life that I look back on with fondness. With that said, it is extremely rare I find an album that resonates so strongly with me. But Superfood’s Bambino is an exception to the rule, as it encapsulates that time of my ...
A hard pill to swallow: animal agriculture is killing us off
Science and Technology, UK Politics

A hard pill to swallow: animal agriculture is killing us off

When we think of British farmers and animal agriculture we often think of them as custodians of an idyllic land, tending to their flocks that wander and graze over the rich, green grass of the British Isles. Maybe this image evokes some essence of national pride, especially knowing that we are somewhat better than other nations in food standards - like the US with their chlorinated chicken. Whilst some don’t like to admit it, this is likely down to EU legislation. Despite this, lurking in our land of hope and glory there are more than 800 American-style 'mega farms' in the UK.  The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) reported that between 2010 and 2016, over 4000 smaller farms have closed as a consequence of the rise of these mega-farms. Considering t...
Could Syria be May’s Falklands moment?
UK Politics, World Politics

Could Syria be May’s Falklands moment?

Much to Theresa May’s benefit, her approval ratings in comparison to Corbyn’s are on the up. According to the latest Opinium poll for the Observer, both parties are on 40%, with Corbyn’s net approval dropping to -19 points. This is exactly what Mrs May needs to hear. With local elections around the corner, the Skripal case, as well as intervention in Syria, could scarily be allowed to become her ‘Falklands moment’. Cast your eyes back to Thatcher’s day; the 1983 election decisively pushed Thatcher’s premiership into a second term. Arguably the Falklands helped to construct an image of Thatcher as some gutsy, pragmatic world leader, despite the fact that the Conservative’s approval ratings dropped as low as 23% between 1979 and 1983. Furthermore, Thatcher’s relationship with Reagan only he...